New Exide AGM Coach Battery

This forum is to ask and questions or concerns in converting your Le'Sharo over to Dodge.

New Exide AGM Coach Battery

Unread postby Terry » Sat Oct 06, 2012 2:39 am

I installed my new Exide 31AGM battery today. I had never received an 80 pound battery in the mail before. I was impressed at how well it was packed. The new battery was larger than the previous one so I had to make some mounting adjustments. I took the opportunity to also install my remote battery disconnect. This will make it so easy to store the rig when I am not powering it. I placed the disconnect switch by the door up high above the tank meter.


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1984 Lesharo, 3.8 Chrysler, Plano, Texas, USA
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Re: New Exide AGM Coach Battery

Unread postby mloganusda » Sat Oct 06, 2012 11:08 am

Are you aware that the AGM batteries take a higher charge rate than deep cycle batteries? From what I have read, the AGM batteries take about 15.5V to charge, which is higher than the 12V RV batteries take.
Mike Logan
Formerly 1986 LeSharo 2.2 gas
Now 04' Rialta
Smyrna, TN
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Re: New Exide AGM Coach Battery

Unread postby Terry » Sat Oct 06, 2012 11:55 am

The coach power converter has the upgraded charger that was told to be great for AGM. I actually havent looked into it since I got this rig, but the last coach AGM lasted about 8 to 10 years. With this setup, wintering is accomplished by simply keeping the unit plugged in to let the charger maintain. And with a switch you can parallel the van battery to the charger if you want. That one is AGM as well.

PD4600 series Upgrade Kits
The built-in Charge Wizard automatically selects one of four operating modes: BOOST, NORMAL, STORAGE, DESULFATION.


http://www.bestconverter.com/4600-series-Upgrade-Kits_c_133.html

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1984 Lesharo, 3.8 Chrysler, Plano, Texas, USA
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Re: New Exide AGM Coach Battery

Unread postby Terry » Sat Oct 06, 2012 12:57 pm

Well I decided to dig and see what I have. It looks to be the 7345RU Replacement Upgrade. So it looks like this is not a nice multi-stage unit like I was lead to believe, just an electronic 45 amp blaster. Interesting. Well, it is quiet and it has never gotten hot and the fan has only come on when it's very hot out. I wonder how this might effect the AGM battery over a multi-stage unit.


7300RU (Replacement Upgrade) Series converter/charger sections provide Parallax 6300 Series Linear Power Centers with whisper quiet operation and ultra-clean, filtered DC power. Filtered DC power is free from "spikes" and "surges", no matter how unstable the AC power source. The 7300RU's filtered power is ideal for use with today's sensitive appliances. A barely audible cooling fan is the only sound emitted while the unit is in operation. Even more, The full Single Stage 45 amp output rating is available for battery charging, virtually eliminating dead or drained batteries.


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Re: New Exide AGM Coach Battery

Unread postby Wanderer » Wed Oct 10, 2012 3:00 pm

AGM batteries can take a higher voltage charge than standard lead acid and can handle vibration without damage. AGM batteries are still technically a lead acid battery and they charge very similar to a wet cell. Regardless of what some rumors portray, AGM batteries are not as sensitive as once believed. They often get confused with Gel Batteries, which are very sensitive to voltage and they need a special charger. AGM batteries can also be equalized to regain capacity if need be. If the battery voltage is drained or once the battery's voltage falls below a certain level, the charger can no longer sense the battery's presence and will refuse to deliver the current. In some cases this can occur at any point below 10.5 volts. Older and more basic chargers are more prone to this hang-up than newer, fancier models, which are equipped with control circuitry to deal with these issues. So there are two solutions available: Buy a new, expensive charger equipped with the extra brainpower, or employ a simple trick the Optima engineers laid on us.
If this should ever happen here's all you need to do: Grab another car battery with a decent charge on it (12.4 volts or better) and connect it in parallel to the problem battery using a set of jumper cables. Then activate the charger and charge the battery normally, being careful to follow the manufacturer's instructions for current and voltage limits. It's as simple as that. The second battery supplies the voltage that tricks the charger into supplying the necessary current. After an hour or so, you can remove the second battery and continue charging until full.


The following charging voltages are recommended for maximum battery life.
3 Stage Chargers
Bulk
14.2-14.4 volts
Acceptance
14.2-14.4 volts
Float
13.2-13.3 volts

2 Stage Charger
Bulk
14.2-14.4 volts
Float
13.2-13.3 volts

Single Stage ChargerBulk
14.2-14.4 volts

Your charger should already meet these specs.

If you are going to repeatedly recharge the battery (as I intend to do with mine) I suggest a 3 stage charger for maximum longevity from your battery.

The three modes/stages of operation include:
Absorption mode/Normal operation
Nominal battery charge and supplies power to appliances

Bulk mode/Charge mode
Fast battery charge and supplies power to appliances

Float mode/Trickle charge
Trickle battery charge during storage

Absorption Mode: During this mode, the converter output is in the
13.6 Vdc range. This is the normal operation mode. This mode
provides the 12 Vdc and current required by the 12 Vdc RV appliances,
as well as slow charging the battery.

Bulk Mode: In this mode, the output voltage of the converter will
switch to 14.4 Vdc range for a maximum of four hours. If the converter
cycles between “Absorption and Bulk mode”, there could be a shorted
battery cell or other issues.

Float Mode: In this mode, the converter is charging the battery with a
trickle voltage of 13.2 Vdc. When the converter senses a demand (by
turning on lights), the converter automatically returns to the
“Absorption mode”.
Lou
Life is hard by the yard; but by the inch it’s a cinch.
1990 Winnebago LeSharo "Wanderer"
Chrysler 3.3L Extended roof
Delray Beach Fl
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